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's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
the start of bargaining time. power and protest. furious demonstrators take to tahrir square in cairo, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to
, then go to israel, to cairo, to meet with mohammed morsi. what are you hearing about what's come out of her talks with netanyahu? >> well, they met for about two hours, and it wasn't just with the prime minister, but the defense minister of israel, the foreign minister, the national security team. they spent two hours going over what's going on. the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position on all these issues. she's making it clear she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on. she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now but throughout the day, as you know, there was speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire agreement. the israelis downplaying that possibility, saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. there's no agreement and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling in southern israel today by hamas and an intensification of israeli attacks in gaza witnessed by what happened to you guys, what you sa
in the west bank the right now she is in cairo meeting with egypt's president. mor morrissey is trying to broker a and when it happens we'll bring it to you live. wolf, i just wanted to ask about this bus attack in tel aviv. how large of a shadow does it cast? >> it's a very big shadow, the first time in at least i'm guessing six years that tel aviv has seen a terrorist incident like this. not that far away from the real commercial hub of the city. regular bus and about 20 people were injured. apparently a terrorist threw a bomb or whatever on the bus and escaped. the israelis did arrest someone later, but it proved to be a false arrest and they let that person go. there is someone on the loose right now who committed this. there are various groups claiming responsibility, though authoritatively no one has yet claimed responsibility. hamas did claim the incident, celebrated it, but didn't claim responsibility for it. one terrorist group claimed responsibility, but it's unclear from analysts if that's just a group trying to claim credibility that they had no involvement in. whatever it
of protests that got rid of his predecessor. details from cairo. >> the crowd, the chants, the violence in tamrir square that overthrough egyptian leader mubarak, but this time to his successor, mohammed morsi. >> this is a new era in egypt. and this is not what it was about. and it's about the president from all of these unquestioned rights. and now, it's just, we're way stepped back than where we were before. >> the protests, which include a ransacking of the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, after sweeping new powers that he could issue any decree and any issue would be filed and not to be appealed or overturned by the courts. >> the revolution has passed, but will not stop. the judiciary is a respected institution along with loyal members, those who wish to hide within the institution i'll be watching them. >> morsi says the moves are temporary. in a few month's time and they call a necessary move to defeat holdovers. and the moves have infuriated the opposition, one time egyptian presidential candidate mohammed el baradei says that he's setting himself up. and today, m
of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basically puts the president above the law and above the courts. the judges have been one of the bitterest opponents of the movement by the president. many judges across the country actually going out on strike. we may see a compromise in the meeting. appears the president underestimated the reaction to hi
turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be a dictator will face off. both opponents and supporters of the president hauling out people and major marches expected on tuesday. >> heather: steve, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions
on this situation with ian lee in cairo tonight. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: well, tom, it's 2:00 a.m. now in cairo. and the protests are still going on. we're still seeing clashes in and around tahrir square between the protesters and the police. we're seeing a range of things thrown back and forth. rocks, we've seen molotov cocktails, we've seen tear gas. there are reports of police shooting into the air to scare off protesters. this is a very intense scene we've seen. we haven't seen anything like this really since a year ago when we saw clashes, when we saw dozens of people killed. this has really been the most intense set of clashes since then and all these protesters are angry about that power grab you were describing where president morsi really has no one overseeing him. the judiciary, he has pushed that aside. he now has really full power and tomorrow, we're going to be watching closely, also, the judiciaries said they might strike basically grinding the whole country's court system to a halt in retaliation for this power grab and also need to point out there are have been
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: police and protesters clashed in cairo's tahrir square and elsewhere in egypt today, sparked when president mohamed morsi granted himself broad new powers. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the widespread demonstrations, and assess what's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we
himself sweeping powers last week. correspondent steve harrigan has the latest from cairo. >> egypt president mohammed morsi is looking for a way out the fire storm he created thursday when he claimed the orders were not subject to review by egypt's court that move sparked four days of violent street in egypt. in the protest, 13 offices of the muslim brotherhood, morsi's chief supporters were ransacked or set on fire. morsi met today with senior judges from the judiciary council looking for a compromise to halt the violence. aides say morsi might be willing to limit the scope of his decree, but not withdraw it entirely. morsi supporters say the increased powers are only temporary, until a new constitution is completed. opponents say it's a power grab and part of an attempt to instill islamic law in egypt. >> we demand the president listen to people who chose it. people elected him so he would defend the people. not to do what he pleases. >> the administration was careful with the words. not overly critical. we raised concerns. that in part answers the questions. >> they reach out fo
continued at this hour in cairo in meetings reportedly taking place involving the prime minister of egypt, the prime minister of turkey as well as the emir trying to come up with a cease-fire there are indications the talks are continuing but here on the ground they plan to implement some kind of ground incursion into gaza if necessary. the military has been offered to draft as many as 57,000 reservists. you can see roads are closed off and see and hear an increased amount of military activity. if there is not a diplomatic solution soon it looks like the violence is going to be ratcheted up. >> heather: david lee miller. thank you. >> gregg: let's take a look. so far 57 rockets have landed inside israel. that doesn't include the 25 rockets that have been intercepted by israel's iron dome. since the started the pillar of defense over 400 rockets and miles have hit hundreds more have been intercepted. how exactly does the iron dome missile defense work? they calculate each rocket's trajectory and only intercepted those that will hate target. this is iron dome to a vast array of sensors to d
alert. more trouble in the middle east. this is in cairo, egypt. you can see the teargas wafting through the streets as protestors take to tahrir square and other places to protest against that country's new president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the p
crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator for the time being or might have unprecedented power throughout this period of two months, but after that, these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament. >> brown: but tens of thousands of anti-morsi protesters rallied in tahrir square, the heart of last year's popular revolution that led to end of the regime of hosni mubarak. they threw rocks at riot police, who retaliated by firing tear gas canisters to disperse the crowds. >> this is just a new era of dictatorship in
cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power grab, trying to become a dictator. both groups will try to get out their constituents on tuesday. it will be a real test of power. the final thing to watch, the country's judges, many are saying they are going on strike. it could shut down the judicial system across the country this week. >> shannon: steve,
in what is now early morning live in cairo, egypt. the white house says president obama called israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and egyptian president mohammed morsi today. the president thanked them for working out a cease-fire deal but also said it's important to keep working on a more durable solution. a live update from the white house coming up on "the fox report." well, tonight, witnesses say the only bullets flying in gaza are shots of celebration. crowds in cars froogd the streets of gaza city after the announcement. earlier today before the deal was done, there was new violence on both sides of the border. team fox coverage continues. david lee miller live in southern israel. david lee, it sounds like the cease-fire is holding at least for now. that's right. trace. it's a little more than five hours since the cease-fire got underway. it is quiet along the border except for the occasional southbound overhead of israeli drones. the scene there very different than hours ago when the cease-fire was announced. there was a barrage of rockets fired into israel. when it took
harrigan is streaming live from cairo with the latest. where do the protests go from here? >> rick, the numbers are down today from what we saw on friday and we're likely to see more large scale protest demonstrations in the coming days, after sunday morning prayers and again on tuesday. what we're likely to see then are really competing margins, those who support the president, who feel like his moves are necessary, to break the log jam and to move the country forward and those who think that the president is trying to achieve a dictatorship. those who are trying to block him. so we're going to see more large scale protests and the other things to watch resignation is, three presidential aides have recently resigned in the past two hours and the judges are refusing, so if it continues to grow, this could put much more pressure on the egyptian president and we're looking at tahrir square and reminded when the crowds were protesti protesting hosni mubarak, who are they and how united are they? >> certainly a lot of similarities both with the scenes and even some of the chants shall
for himself a new dictatorship. reza sayah is in cairo right now. do these protesters have a point? is this the same style of leadership that triggered the arab spring? >> if you ask the protesters if they have a point, they'll give you an emphatic yes. these are demonstrators who believe the revolution, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged
this thing will last. gregg: did secretary clinton's shuttle diplomacy from jerusalem to cairo prove pen official here? >> -- beneficial here in. >> yes, certainly. the administration deserves credit, to be sure, but it's not a major victory in the sense that we have a middle east peace which has been as elusive to this administration as it has been to the previous ones. but at the end of her reign as secretary of state, her tenure is coming to conclusion with mounting criticism over benghazi and the lack of security, this certainly is a plus. gregg: are you surprised at how helpful the new islamist government of muhammad morsi really was in this process as a mediator standing up for the truce, probably pressuring hamas and, of course, their benefactor? are you surprised at what they did? yeah. i think it's a pleasant surprise. i mean, this is not the government we would have wanted in egypt post-mubarak because they are muslim brotherhood, and there's parts of the muslim brotherhood that is totally alien to us, the salafist movement which are radical islamists, but here he is openly spo
and egyptian leaders in cairo, egypt. coming up for you at 7:15, what egypt's president is saying this morning about the possibilities for a cease-fire. >>> it's 7:07. we want to check in with sal for an update on a terrible situation on caltrain, a train fatality. >> that's right. caltrain, major delays this morning because train number 103 northbound hit a pedestrian in palo alto, a lot of people were taken off the train and they are being put on buses. a lot of these people are very late to work and the train is stopped here on the tracks northbound. now, the southbound trains are moving through. but it is going to be pretty slow going and caltrain has major delays. there are those people who are -- i don't know what they are waiting for but perhaps they are waiting to get on the bus here that's gonna take them to the next caltrain station. let's take a look at the bay bridge toll plaza. that's bocked up all the way -- backed up beyond the 880 overcrossing. that major problems getting into san francisco once on the bridge itself. we talked about 101 and highway 1, a little bit of slowing he
prince of qatar and cairo. even the tunisian prime minister that's visited gaza, and this is a muslim brotherhood president who has very close ties to hamas and, therefore, he is a valid interlocuture. >> i don't think they want to see a ground war or an extension of this conflict because it will destabilize an already destabilized region, especially considering what's happening in syria. >> ambassador let's talk about israeli politics as former ambassador to israel, you know the political system there well. we just finished our election. there's an election coming up in january. how much of this could possibly be the prime minister showing the strength of his administration as he stands there at the boarder? >> i think there's an element of that. i think the first thing is the fact that the rockets, especially the rockets that have a range of about 45 to 46 miles and that can come close to even tel aviv, that that is the immediate catalyst for this operation, but there's no doubt that prime minister netanyahu see some political utility in showing a hard line to protect israel's natio
. protesters on the streets of cairo for a fourth straight day. you can see the crowds there. battle lines are now drawn. we're talking about newly empowered islamists versus remnants of the mubarak regime and the country's deeply divided liberals. they're going at it. the president's new powers now. today egyptian president mohammed morsi is meeting with the country's top judges to explain the extraordinary powers that he granted himself on thursday. among the decrees, judges cannot overturn any decision he makes or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constituti
today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any dec
are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense of euphoria. there's going to be hangover when the dust settles when they bury the dead and count the costs, there ought to be as there was after cass led in 2008-2009, a clear contrast with a much better situ
-moon arrived in cairo just hours after egypt's intelligence chief gave an israeli delegation a letter from hamas outlining its conditions for a cease fire. so far on the israeli side, officials say throw people have died. 68 have been wounded as the result of rocket fire from gaza and in gaza, officials say 104 people have been killed. 860 have been wounded since the conflict began. as for fire power, israel says militants in gaza have fired nearly 1,000 rockets at israel. 570 of them have actually struck israel. another 307 have been intercepted by israel's so-called iron dome defense system. meanwhile, israel carried out 80 strikes today. it has now targeted 1,300 sites in gaza since last wednesday ch ben wedeman is in gaza city tonight. how are civilians dealing with this conflict? the numbers are frightening. >> reporter: they're not dealing very well with it. it's a very difficult situation. you have to keep in mind, erin, that here in gaza, they don't have early warning systems. they don't have bomb shelters. they don't have an iron dome system to protect them. so, they feel very exp
president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm swan song enabling the outgoing secretary of state to bask over her work in countrys like burma. instead, both spent much of their time in asia intensively dialing up mideast leaders. the president speaking with morsi three times in 24 hours. including aboard air force one on the way home to america. the president tan secretary both been on the phone, nonstop with regional leaders for a number of days. the purpose of her trip is to continue and intensify that engagement now face to face. >> the stakes for the president are enormous on the eaves of a second term. with analysts warping it may be the beginning of a much wider conflict between israel and iran. >> there is rise of al-qaeda and radical islam in the middle east that have taken advantage of the re-lutionnary change sweeping through the region. in the shadows here is
, secretary of state hillary clinton will travel to cairo and push for a truce.
hours, secretary of state hillary clinton will travel to cairo and push for a truce. stay with cnn for the latest on the middle east crisis and peace efforts. all for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now.
, thousands of protesters spilling into the streets of cairo again this morning demanding president mohammed morsi be thrown out of office. they are angry over morsey's decision to give himself sweeping powers. a massive power grab on thursday into friday. peter doocy joins us live from d.c. with the latest. peter, this was frightening at how quick it happened and how it came immediately after susan rice praised what mr. morsey did there. >> right, dave. and mohammed morsi is actually egypt's first democratically elected president. but many of his people are protesting because he issued this decree that puts all his decisions in the past, present and future above judicial review. he can do whatever he wants and the lower courts can't. ' assembly writing egypt's new constitution can do so without any objections now, the u.s. state department issued a statement making their reservations about president morsey crystal clear and basically stating that the entire idea of the arab spring was the opposite of what's happening in egypt. the state department says, quote: one of the aspirations of the
tension in the middle east. this is cairo, egypt. this is the scene in tahrir square and almost nightfall. look at the crowd that has gathered after lawmakers approve a new constitution threatening to inflame already tense situation between the opposition and the heart-line government. steve hair gan streaming -- harrigan, streaming live in cairo, egypt the constitution already written. coming under sharp criticism. what do we know about it, steve? >> reporter: it is being criticized by opponents of this government. first of all people say it is a rush job. they basically pulled an all-nighter last night to write a constitution. 16 hours of debate. finally getting it through. there is real concerns about the role of islamic law in the new constitution. concerns about the protection of women's rights in this constitution. basically this is document written by the muslim brotherhood because all liberal members of this assembly walked out long ago, bill. bill: is there a chance that will diffuse the protests we have seen so far, steve? >> reporter: the hopes were on the president's side that
who was definitely pretty tough in his remarks in a news conference out of cairo. he says israel has to make the first move. he was angry with benjamin netanyahu regarding the killing of one of hamas's top military commanders. i want you to listen to what he said this morning. >> translator: today netanyahu wanted to achieve three goals with several messages, but he did not succeed. yes, no doubt he succeeded in assassinating the heroic leader, but he wanted to maintain his ability in deterence, but it failed. >> you have been covering this region for a long time. when you hear him and you hear the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu saying that there is -- they're not going wait around forever here, is this political bluster? is this rhetted rhetoric? is there something more behind this? are we going to see an escalation? >> i think at the moment it does feel like political bluster on all sides. i mean, imagine this as well. when he was speaking there in cairo, at the same time it was just after a building used by palestinian media inside gaza had been struck by israeli missil
is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty for killing protesters in masters revolution, they would be retried. president mohammed morsi on the heel
if the protest bubble up in cairo and west bank and keeping our eye in jordan where there are protest against the king there who is a u.s. ally. >> and i think the cease fire doesn't last too long. half of the israelies who said they stopped the military campaign too soon and hamas celebrating. what are they celebrating in gaza? this is not going to last. >> in egypt brotherhood. >> morsi is a dictator over night. nexactly. he is a dictator over night muslim brotherhood saying it is it smoke and mirrors. we'll see what happens. we'll go to other head lines. thick fog triggering this deadly traffic pile up on texas interstate. from the air crush of car trucks looking a stack of toys. vehicles were twisted on top of each other. nthere were three car necessary front of me and i saw it about to happen and i was able to stop without hitting anyone. but there was panic of who might hit me. >> it was like people pay attention to what you are doing? >> sadly on thanksgiving, two people were killed and 80s injured. >> walmart workers making good on the threat on the busiest shopping day of the year. t
their head together aniston the violence. bill: she's going to go to jerusalem, and cairo, with the sepgs o exception of gaza city. bill: fighting to keep a 60-year-old tradition going people are fighting. martha: nascar champion brad cowalousky joins us live in the studio here. we'll be back. martha: atheists seem to have ended a 60-year-old christmas tradition in santa monica, california. way to go, right? district judge audrey b. collins denying a request to allow the display of religious nativity while their lawsuit plays out against the city. >> it was something i grew up nothing. i think it' knowing. i think it's kind of sad. martha: they are trying to put a stop to it in that town. the city council passed a measure on the heels of a dispute last winter after atheists put up these displays with anti-god sentiment. the judge says the displays were starting to drain city resources. bill: how about that. some are calling him the new face of nascar, and he just won the nascar sprint cup title. brad keselowski is with me now in studio and this guy has a story to tell. hey, man congratulati
familiar with the shuttle diplomacy that she's been participating in it was her intent in arriving in cairo, it was agreed with all the groups that they would make this announcement. jenna: it looked like hillary was just beginning to speak. we want to see if we can listen in. let's go ahead and listen. >> egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. the united states -- [inaudible] >> the people of this region deserve the chance. jenna: we are trying to hear what hillary clinton has to say. we are trying to work with the translator as you can possibly make out. some statements here from secretary of state hillary clinton announcing a cease-fire which will go into effect 9:00pm local time. we will continue to watch her and hopefully get her audio directly, in the meantime jonathan talk to us a little bit more about what is next, talk to us about the optics of this. hillary clinton making this announcement in egypt, with top egyptian officials of a new government. what does this mean? >> we
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)